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Financial Accounting


Financial Accounting
Financial Accounting

Libby/Libby/Short wrote this text based on their belief that the subject of financial accounting is inherently interesting, but financial accounting textbooks are often not. They believe most financial accounting textbooks fail to demonstrate that a
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful


4.0 out of 5 stars
Cheap!, September 5, 2011



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I'm so glad I went with the loose leaf option. It's much cheaper and its the same as the hardcover in terms of content. I just got a binder for it - which actually makes it easier to study from!


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful


4.0 out of 5 stars
Financial Accounting - Libby 7th Ed., December 12, 2011


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This review is from: Financial Accounting (Hardcover)


Good book for those just getting into financial accounting. Obviously you're buying this book because your professor told you so. The examples are good and extensive and provide good knowledge into the subject matter.


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful


5.0 out of 5 stars
Great textbook for accounting, March 9, 2012



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This review is from: Financial Accounting (Hardcover)


I purchased this book because it is the textbook that is required for my very first graduate-level accounting class. Since starting class about 5 weeks ago, I've quickly determined that I'm going to have to teach myself the content of the course since the professor really doesn't "teach" per se...I've realized that 95% of my learning for the class will have to come straight from the text...and in that regard, it's been a great textbook to introduce me to financial accounting. Would I buy it to read in my spare time? Highly unlikely. But as a textbook for a course, it's great. And I LOVE that it was less expensive on Amazon that it was at the university bookstore. BAM. My only wish is that there was an accompanying guide with the solutions to all the problems that are at the end of the chapter...I'd buy that in a minute!!


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List Price: $ 125.03

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Related Accounting Textbooks

Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life


Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life
Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life

Critical Thinking is about becoming a better thinker in every aspect of your life: in your career, and as a consumer, citizen, friend, parent, and lover. Discover the core skills of effective thinking; then analyze your own thought processes, identi
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112 of 122 people found the following review helpful


5.0 out of 5 stars
1st rule in business: Thou shalt not B.S. thyself, July 25, 2004


By 
John C. Dunbar (Sugar Land, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
  





This review is from: Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life (Hardcover)


This book presents a process of analytical thinking that will help you make rational decisions. It also presents many thinking exercises you can apply immediately. Of great importance is the author's descriptions of how the brain tricks itself into making wrong decisions.

The writing is very readable and generally keeps you riveted to the material. However, you must frequently stop and think about the ramifications of what the author is presenting. Each sentence, paragraph, section, chapter is deeply thought out. There is great detail and information to consider.

The exercises were useful, although there were a few that were too simplistic. Sometimes the exercises were too repetitive to material just presented in the text (repetition of the same questions, in the same order). But overall, the exercises were most valuable and I will probably return there on later readings of this book.

There is one reviewer of this book that took issue with the sections discussing how to analyze controversial issues. I had the same reservations. After presenting detailed logic on how to think through issues objectively, I thought the authors let their own anarchist biases effect their proposed analyses of controversial issues, turning these sections into a rhetoric for their political positions. If they had said that their logic was just one analysis of the issues then that would be OK, but instead they presented their controversial analyses as the correct one. These really detracted from the power of the material as I thought of many poor assumptions made on their part.

But fortunately, the political rhetoric and controversial issues section of the book was small... at most 2 chapters.

However, there is so much to like about this book. I highly recommend this book for anyone who wants to learn a process for critical thinking. It is so easy for our minds to let non-rational factors determine our decisions. Worse, we often don't realize that our mind is playing tricks on ourselves. And, this is to our detriment.

By applying the authors' rules and exercises you can help catch this flawed, mostly ego-centric thinking while its still in the midst of a crime.

John Dunbar

Sugar Land, TX


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265 of 301 people found the following review helpful


2.0 out of 5 stars
Great expectations disappointed, December 28, 2002


By 
Chapman Flack (Lafayette, IN United States) - See all my reviews



This review is from: Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life (Hardcover)


Richard Paul and Linda Elder are affiliated with the Center for Critical Thinking, which I discovered several years ago when it was operating under the auspices of Sonoma State University. I first encountered Dr. Paul's writing through several fine pieces on the CCT web site, and they established my expectations for this book.

I should mention my misgivings about the phrase 'critical thinking.' It has critical mass as a buzz-phrase, and is susceptible to all of the risks that go with that--chiefly the risk that an assortment of people advocating widely different intellectual practices all find it advantageous to paste that popular name on their disparate wares. Even worse, I have encountered people to whom 'critical thinking' turns on the sense of 'critical' that means captious or disputatious, and who think of it as something nice people don't do; another entire camp seems to maintain that 'critical thinking' is achieved by nothing more than disparagement of reason and an inclination to question and deconstruct everything in sight. Taken far enough, these divergent uses of any 'in' buzzword can threaten to strip it completely of meaning; one cannot be grateful enough that the Center for Critical Thinking is still around and pushing the real deal: rigorous intellectual standards, commitment to clarity and reason and fairmindedness, with all that commitment demands.

But this book makes a disappointing vehicle. Contributing not least to the disappointment are lapses of editing and proofreading that should never be seen in a finished book. Perhaps embarrassments of grammar, spelling, and punctuation do not count directly against the book's intellectual content--but they could lead many readers to underestimate what the book has to offer. That's too bad.

A more serious weakness is the want of exercises that genuinely test the reader's thinking. If learning to think critically is replacing comfortable modes of thought with modes that can be evaluated to standards, an important motivator may be to bump against those standards regularly. But many of the exercises are of the "write down something you think about X" variety notable for not having wrong answers. The questions are often good ones and the exercises are not all busy work, but neither are they as demanding as they could be, and some readers may find them condescending.

An extreme example is found in Chapter 7--The Standards for Thinking--with respect to the standard of 'logicalness,' which gets a treatment of barely one page. A space not much larger could present some rudiments of logic, but this treatment offers only a vague, intuitive appeal and an exercise to identify decisions "based on illogical thinking--thinking that didn't make sense to you." A reader's familiar, and possibly unexamined, judgments about what is "logical" will not necessarily be refined by this approach.

The whole of Chapter 14--The Power and Limits of Professional Knowledge--is likewise disappointing. It seems to promise a disciplined approach to the decision of how much deference is due the pronouncements of professionals on different occasions and topics but, beyond outlining general reasons for skepticism, it doesn't deliver. It offers little insight into how that skepticism should be sensibly qualified, and is a little incautious with some of its own claims: I was surprised to read (p. 260) in a 2002 book that "the medical field is highly resistant" to the role of viruses and bacteria in heart disease and cancer.

I am especially troubled by the Chapter 14 discussion of mathematics (and ought to reveal here that it was my undergraduate major). Here the authors seem to lose sight of their objective and, instead of addressing how mathematical 'expert opinion' should be received, treat instead the value of math education. They suggest that because (a) many are traumatized by doing poorly in math and (b) many who do well still do not cultivate the habit of applying mathematical insight in everyday life, perhaps curricula beyond basic arithmetic should not be mandatory. This despite the number of pressing issues that demand critical thought and require a mathematical understanding. In this one section the authors seem to verge on one of the debased senses of 'critical thinking.' I would go to the mat with them on this one, but there are more comments to make.

A near-disastrous feature of the book is the use made of charged, controversial issues. This is tricky business: of course the very point of critical thinking is to apply it to important issues, and without them the teaching would not be engaging or effective. The authors do well when they present a hot issue as the explicit focus of an exercise, asking the reader to think fairmindedly through all sides; "Thinking Broadly" on p. 105 is a good example. The "Reading Backwards" list is conscientiously selected and balanced. But controversial positions also appear in passing as examples of good or poor thinking,...




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43 of 49 people found the following review helpful


5.0 out of 5 stars
Tools & Concepts for Critical Thinking, February 7, 2003


By 
Gerald Nosich (University of New Orleans, LA, U.S.) - See all my reviews



This review is from: Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life (Hardcover)


This is a book for business people, for people in a profession, and for people in any arena who simply want to learn how to live their lives in a more rational and ultimately more fulfilling way. In the authors' recurrent phrase, it contains abundant tools for taking charge of one's life. As such, it not only contains good business sense, it contains good sense for living a better life as well.

It's a crisp, clear, useful book. The authors consistently address the heart of each essential aspect of critical thinking in multiple domains. They explain each aspect clearly, trace out its implications, offer effective advice on how to deal with it both as an individual and as a professional. They even supply activities and questions-in inserts labeled "Test the Idea"-for applying that aspect of critical thinking to the reader's own unique circumstances.

The book combines strategic thinking, self-knowledge, fairness toward others, and a down-to-earth, usable ideal of justice. It shows not only how to advance in each, but how those qualities fit together with and further one another. So there is a sense in which the book is essentially about human fulfillment (though that isn't explicitly addressed as a main topic)-fulfillment for myself through understanding, honest self-assessment, and taking control of my life; fulfillment for others in ideals of fairmindedness and justice; fulfillment for the planet as a whole in how the qualities combine.

One of the most invigorating features of Critical Thinking is the way the book covers a whole range of topics clearly and explicitly. The coverage is brief and to the point, but it allows for a wealth of further application for those readers who are willing to incorporate the authors' guidelines into their day-to-day life.

For example, Paul and Elder devote only two pages to a clear, succinct discussion of understanding implications (one of the key elements of reasoning). Then there is a quick "Test the Idea" box. It asks the reader to describe a problem he or she is facing, to formulate alternative decisions to address that problem, and finally to think out the logical implications of each alternative decision. Notice two features of this that seem to go in almost opposite directions: first, how simple the activity is, how do-able, and second how life-transforming it would be if I consistently thought through my potential decisions in terms of a range of alternatives and a conscious awareness of the implications of each. The book consistently offers the same clarity coupled with profundity for each topic covered.

The actual topics covered in the book are just the ones people need to address to take charge of their lives:

-How to think realistically in a world full of change and danger.
-How to evaluate my own thinking across a range of dimensions:
* my skills and abilities
* my self-understanding
* my overall stage as a thinker
-How to improve my thinking-again in a range of dimensions, including:
* the parts of thinking
* the standards of good thinking
* making intelligent decisions
* thinking within corporate life
* increasing the level of my strategic thinking.
-How to deal with egocentrism and sociocentrism.
-How to think reasonably about and within the ethical dimension of our lives.

The book goes deep into the way our unconscious or barely conscious processes rule so much of our conscious thinking. It provides practical strategies for unveiling and confronting our irrational tendencies. Surprisingly in an age of extended therapies, the strategies are often simple and direct-and eminently useful. For example a "Test the Idea" section on "Unearthing Dysfunctional Egocentric Thinking" directs you to "think of a time when your desire to selfishly get what you wanted failed because of your egocentric behavior." It then asks you to describe the situation, to describe your resulting thoughts, wants and behavior, and then to describe a more rational way to think and behave in that situation.

This approach is related to Cognitive Therapy, except that the approach Paul and Elder take is more thorough-going and founded in a deeper and more robust conception of what healthy, reasonable thinking is. It is also a simple "visualization" technique, of the kind that is so effective in altering people's behavior. Only, instead of merely visualizing a healthier way to behave in a situation, I am directed now to use my whole mind (not just my visual imagination).

Another bright feature of the book is that the ethical dimension is covered so well. This is usually neglected in business-oriented books and even in personal-health books. The authors discuss and give "Test the Idea" activities in key aspects of ethical thought and action. The conception they teach is a profound one: being ethical is far different from simply accepting rules imposed on us from outside; it is also...




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List Price: $ 40.99

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Accounting Principles


Accounting Principles
Accounting Principles

Weygandt's Accounting Principles introduces challenging accounting concepts with examples that are familiar to accountants. The new edition has been updated with the latest IFRS/IASB standards. Additional coverage is included on foreign currency tran
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful


1.0 out of 5 stars
BOOK SUCKS, September 14, 2011



This review is from: Accounting Principles (Hardcover)


THis is the worst textbook ever coming from a students point of view!! Its easy to understand but when trying to do the problems at the end of each chapter there are no answers.. so how am i to know if i am doing a problem right or wrong?? I hate when you spend over 0 for a textbook and there are no answers to problems in the back. Its a waste of my money and time. Its not a useful textbook esp when you have a teacher who confuses the crap out of you because they cant teach and jump around all the time in lecture. I have had teachers before like this n the best thing was the answers in the back of the book bc that is what saved me and helped me teach myself the course.


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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful


1.0 out of 5 stars
HORRIBLE PRICE, January 25, 2012


By 
Al (New York) - See all my reviews



Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)


This review is from: Accounting Principles (Hardcover)


This book is terrible, pages are super thin. Its a pretty big book though so thats why. It has about or more than 1300 Pages. What really is terrible is that with such a high cost coming at almost 0 it does not bring a WileyPlus code. Damn publishers are crooks.

Update (5.27.12): I returned this book, and bought a loose edition w/ wiley plus code at my college store for much less. Pages are still thin, the book however is easy to understand. Chapters get to the point quickly but put a lot of examples to explain the concepts which is great. Overall its a good book, BUT the price the publisher imposes even for the loose leaf edition is high.


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful


1.0 out of 5 stars
Really Disappointed, August 29, 2012



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This review is from: Accounting Principles (Hardcover)


So I spent the extra money to buy this book in new condition to insure that I would have the Wiley Access Code. However, when the book arrived there was no Wiley Access Code. So now I have to return the book and waste more time. I'm less than pleased.


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List Price: $ 115.00

Price: $ 115.00

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